Arrrrrrrrrrrgggggggggggg

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Lynn Brazelton
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Joined: Feb. 25th, 2011
Arrrrrrrrrrrgggggggggggg

Went to the ICORE match today, June 12, with great hopes of doing better than I have been doing. Arrrrrrrrrrrrgggggggggg, got the dreaded DQ! On the second stage at that, so didn't even have the fun of shooting! Man oh man, what a bummer. However, let me make this comment. The DQ was for the muzzle breaking the 180 plane, so it's much better to be DQ'd than it is to have some sort of accident. Also, with the DQ it made me really look at how I approach the stage. In my case, I started on the right hand side of the stage, and being right handed, as I moved to the left while reloading, I brought the muzzle around too far. I would have been much better off starting on the left side of the stage, and as I was moving to the right while reloading, the muzzle would have been much easier to control. Am I unhappy about the DQ? Darned right I am! But believe me, I am unhappy with myself and not at all with the call. After all, the call was made to keep everyone safe, not to be picking on me! For anyone, I hope you don't take a DQ the wrong way. Be upset for sure, but remember, it is all about keeping us all safe. I have to pass out kudos to the guys for making the difficult call they did, as I was being unsafe!

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NVSA Staff
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Joined: Feb. 8th, 2011
Two years ago I got a 180 DQ

Two years ago I got a 180 DQ called on me. Let me tell you I know exactly the feeling. You think how is that possible. How did that happen. If you play this game long enough it is bound to happen to you too. I have issued more DQ's to shooters than I have gotten my self. I can vouch that issuing one isn't a whole lot different than getting one. It is no fun to give either.

One thing I can say is that you were a true gentlemen. You cleaned up your stuff. You then came back and helped tape and brass. You then stayed and helped tear down the stages. You showed nothing but class. I look forward to shooting with you again.

"If you plan to leave early, please arrive early to help set up. If you arrive late, please stay late to help take down. If you plan to arrive late and leave early, please do your shooting someplace else."

Lynn Brazelton
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Joined: Feb. 25th, 2011
Thanks for your comments Ty.

Thanks for your comments Ty. I would like to think that I only did what others would do. After all, nobody to get mad at except myself. I'm the one that did a stupid blunder, and was just rightly called on it. I can only imagine how difficult it must be to call it on someone knowing that you are ending their day. But that class is what I see in our SO"s out there and why I'm really enjoying the club. Folks are friendly to newcomers, help them out where necessary and just in general do a great job. I'll be back for sure. See you next weekend!

Lynn

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Mark Barr
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Joined: Feb. 23rd, 2011
Lynn, I want to second what

Lynn,

I want to second what Ty said about the way you handled your DQ today.  You're a good sport and eager to learn this game we play.  Attitude is everything.  I think yours is outstanding.

My Dad had a Accidental Discharge (AD) DQ once at an IDPA match in Ione.  He had his muzzel in a safe direction, but his trigger finger bumped the trigger when he slammed the mag into the gun during a reload.  "Boom".  His good muzzel etiquette made it a "safe AD" if there is such a thing.  I'm sure it will never happen again.

When I first walk through a stage, I always do a risk vs benefit analysis.

  1) If there is no reason not to do so, I prefer to start on the left side of a barrel or wall, so I can turn to the right during the reload with the muzzel safely down range.

 2) If the gun starts in a briefcase or IDPA box, I plan out where my hads will be to open the box and usually target the far right target first, so the muzzel stays well away from me weak had that is opening the case.

3) If I start seated with the gun holstered, I shoot the far right target first, so the muzzel is nowhere near sweeping my right knee. My right foot is always inside the leg of the chair with the foot pointing straight or even left, so I can draw my pistol without risk of sweeping my foot.

4) If the stage calls for a draw and then opening the door, I hold the gun at high chest level, sideways (so the RO can see my straight finger outside the trigger guard). I also step back as I open the door, so I'm behind cover (and the door can't hit my gun).

5) I look at the tape pattern on each target to help estimate the shooting difficulty (shooting speed) for that target.  If there is lots of tape in the -3 zone all over the target, that usually means there is something difficult about that target.  I can then compensate by planning a slower pace on that target or even planning an extra shot.

6) If possible, I peek at the next stage to be shot while a squad is still shooting it. That way, I can SEE what I need to do when I get to that stage. A picture IS worth a thousand words  If I'm first on the stage, I will be less likely to make a stupid mistake, like failing to engage a target.

Does anyone have other "tricks"  or safety considerations they think about when planning a stage.  Share them here.  I think we can all benefit.

See you all next week for IDPA,

Mark Barr

Lynn Brazelton
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Joined: Feb. 25th, 2011
Good stuff Mark, I'll read

Good stuff Mark, I'll read that a number of times. Thanks.

Lynn

Mark Hicks
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Joined: Apr. 10th, 2011
Lynn, it has been a pleasure

Lynn, it has been a pleasure to see you come out and join us and the level of interest that you have taken in our club.  Your attitude about the DQ is exactly  the way it should be.  No one likes to see them, but when needed, it has to be called.  We won't have anything if we aren't safe.   See you Sunday, Mark Hicks

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